Disclosed All Curious Facts About Octopuses

THE OCTOPUS – SOME CURIOSITIES

The giant octopus is an animal more unique than rare for morphology, camouflage skills and intelligence like all octopuses. Here are some curiosities that make Molluscs Cephalopods so extraordinary.

Identity card of our giant Pacific octopus

  • Gender: male
  • Country of origin: Canada
  • Living environment: shallow coastal waters
  • Weight on arrival: 7.5 kg
  • Length of the tentacles on arrival: 70 cm
  • Diet: mainly molluscs and crustaceans
  • Distinguishing features: it has 8 arms

Octopus HAS 3 HEARTS

Octopuses have three hearts: the systemic heart and two “auxiliary” hearts, which support the circulatory system in the gill areas to optimize gas exchange.

Octopus HAS “BLUE BLOOD”

In the octopus blood, there is hemocyanin, a protein containing copper atoms, which has the function of carrying oxygen. Hemocyanin is responsible for the different shades of blue in the blood of these animals.

WHY DON’T Octopus TENTACLES CLOSE UP?

The octopus suckers can stick to anything, with the exception of other parts of the octopus’s body itself. This happens thanks to a self-recognition mechanism present in the skin, which inhibits the adhesion reflex of the suction cups.

Octopus CAN BECOME INVISIBLE

Thanks to a network of specialized cells, the chromatophores, and the muscles of its skin, the octopus can take on the appearance of the surrounding environment in a very short time, in shapes and colors, until it becomes invisible. The chromatophores are surrounded by a crown of muscles and contain pigment granules which, in response to nerve stimuli, concentrate or expand, allowing these animals to take on the right color to blend in with the backdrop. Particular chromatophores are able to reflect light, creating metallic iridescence.

SPRAY INK IF YOU FEEL THREATENED

With the exception of the abyssal species, octopuses are endowed with a gland that produces a black liquid, rich in melanin, commonly known as ink. Released into the water in case of danger, the ink forms a dense cloud that confuses the predator and allows the Cephalopod to escape.

A SKILLED “ILLUSIONIST”

And if it were still not enough to change shape and color, disappear in a cloud of irritating ink, flatten and slip into seemingly inaccessible crevices, this illusionist can do even better. In the seas of Indonesia, octopuses capable of hiding inside the coconut shells have been observed, closing the two halves of the fruit casing on their body perfectly hidden inside.

THE MOST INTELLIGENT OF THE INVERTEBRATES

Octopuses have remarkable learning skills. They are able to open, with surprising skill, jars containing food and use objects to hide from predators. Read more octopus girl

CONSCIOUS INTELLIGENCE

Further demonstrating his intelligence, the Cambridge declaration on consciousness includes the octopus in the list of animals that have self-awareness. The document, signed in 2012 by a group of scientists in the presence of Stephen Hawking and in the light of research and scientific evidence, could only contemplate the cephalopod among “conscious” animals since it has been shown that at the presynaptic level it receives serotonin, a neurotransmitter which regulates the mood, emotions and depressive states in many animals.

THE MOST POISONOUS

Blue ringed octopus. These octopuses, inhabitants of the coasts of the Pacific Ocean, from Japan to Australia, are some of the most venomous animals in the world. Although they do not exceed 20 cm in length, they can, if provoked, attack humans, injecting with their bite a lethal poison, for which there is currently no antidote.

A MASTER OF TRANSFORMISM

Mime octopus. This Indo-Pacific species is able to mimic the appearance and behavior of over 15 marine animals, including lionfish, crabs, sea snakes, and sole. In a few moments, it becomes the most suitable species to face the predator that is threatening it at that moment.

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